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Kaua’i Day 5

Berries on Powerline trailWe snorkel in front of the Princeville Hotel but quickly discover that that was a bad decision. The run-off from all the rain last night has reduced visibility significantly and — as we find out later — increased the levels of bad bacteria in the water. I quickly loose interest and hang out in the hot tub which does wonders to my aching spine (getting old sucks). (Continued)

Kaua’i Day 4

EelZulah’s snorkeling experience off Anini Beach convinces us to go back and explore that area some more. Zulah manages to find the site with the crab again. But it is quite cloudy today which makes the underwater world look mostly grey. (Continued)

Kaua’i Day 3

Sunset at Princeville HotelChristmas Day. I call family and friends in Germany and marvel about the 11 hour time difference (off-topic: My Dad tells me about wheat prices going up because the US is turning 30% of their wheat into fuel). My neck hurts and I decide to take it easy today (no snorkeling). Zulah, Torsten, and Eric explore the reef just east of our place and see four turtles and various other cool animals. (Continued)

Kaua’i Day 2

Big Wave SetupThis morning we open our eyes to even bigger waves. Soon we are watching the first jet ski pulling a big wave surfer into these monsters. It is fascinating to watch how the surfer is shooting off across the 30 feet walls of water while the jet ski tries to quickly get behind the wave before it breaks. The waves are so big that the jet ski can’t see the surfer and has to guess which direction the surfer is going. We wince every time a surfer gets caught in the churning white of the breaking wave and hope that the jet ski manages to pick him up quickly. Big surfers seem to use foot straps and no leash. More than once we watch the jet ski first picking up the surfer and then carefully retrieving the board near the reef. (Continued)

Kaua’i Day 1

Sealodge View LeftWhen we arrived last night after dark we just heard the big thunder of the waves. It sounded more like jet aircrafts than the California coast surf we are used to. This morning we see why: the waves are huge! Our place has a beautiful panorama onto the Pacific. We are located at place called Sealodge that is attached to the large Princeville Resort. (Continued)

Storing Digital Memories (Part 2)

Whatever media digital information is stored on — the only way to figure out whether the information is still usable is to try using it. So I decided to move my photo archive to the living room and connect it via a MacMini to our HDTV. (Continued)

Storing Digital Memories (Part 1)

It is surprisingly difficult to digitally store personal records such as photos so that they are available for generations. During the last decade millions of dollars were spent to come up with strategies on how to preserve digital media in institutions such as public libraries. But what about all the personal records before they are deemed worthy to be preserved by institutions? (Continued)

Migrating to WordPress at Dreamhost

One of the reasons for not posting to my old blog for so long was that iBlog became so unreliable that I was afraid another post would further corrupt its database. I finally decided that the only way to save this blog from oblivion was to reactivate it and put it at a place I trust (Dreamhost) using popular blogging software (WordPress). (Continued)

Quote of the Day

“tag superpositions solve the problem of hierarchy and polysemy in folksonymous systems without abandoning the flexibility of a bottom-up emergent domain vocabulary.” Maciej Ceglowski, delicious-discuss, 1/11/2005, 9:57PM PST

Del.icio.us Web

I still remember how I was blown away when I checked out DEC’s AltaVista search engine for the first time almost 10 years ago. Up to that point bookmarks were the most important navigation instrument and people used to exchange new discoveries by email: the cooler your friends the cooler your bookmarks. For a while you could even buy real, physical paper books listing bookmarks. Then, when AltaVista search started to suck, Google’s “I feel lucky” search jumped in. Google’s PageRanking proved to be so good that I didn’t really need bookmarks anymore. I just needed to remember a good search term to retrieve a site.

Or, at least I thought so until I discovered del.icio.us.

(Continued)